What Does It Cost To Run An Electric Radiator

This is one of the common questions that surround electric radiators and is one that never goes away: “how much does an electric radiator cost to run?”. It would be great if we could provide an exact figure on running costs associated with these heating systems, but there are many factors that contribute to these … Continue reading "What Does It Cost To Run An Electric Radiator"

This is one of the common questions that surround electric radiators and is one that never goes away: “how much does an electric radiator cost to run?”. It would be great if we could provide an exact figure on running costs associated with these heating systems, but there are many factors that contribute to these costs. Asking the question “what is the running cost of an electric radiator” is similar to asking: “what will my utility bill be at the end of this month”, which is an answer that will vary significantly from one home to the next. It is practically impossible to provide set figures that are applicable to each residence across the UK.

It becomes easy to classify an electric radiator with other types of electrical appliances in homes, yet heating should be approached with a different mindset. Even though television sets and electric radiators both run off electricity, the way they use this energy is fundamentally different. For instance, a television will use energy consistently while in use and then only stop energy use once turned off. This is not the case for an electric radiator. Instead, they use an internal thermostat in order to turn off and on, which will depend on the temperature that was chosen for that room. This means that an electric radiator only uses energy if the heat levels need to be topped up.

Are There Other Factors That Affect The Running Costs Of An Electric Radiator?

Determining the exact figures for the running costs of electric radiators is also complex as they heat different room spaces and home types. For this reason, it would probably better to ask an Electric Heating Expert to give you clarity on the different variables that affect cost and heating that are in your home. Each space in a home will be different, and each has its own variables and requirements which can have an impact on the efficiency of the heating system in your home. Here is a list of some of the primary factors that can affect how much it will cost to run an electric radiator.

Room And Home Insulation

If your home is older, it will probably cost you more to operate a heating system in comparison to newer builds that are similar in size, due to the differences in how each home was constructed. The more modern homes are a lot more air-tight, along with improved insulation levels due to the latest building regulations that are aimed at making new homes a lot more energy-efficient. This insulation standard that is more stringent will mean that an electric radiator will cost less in order to run in a newer home in association with heat loss levels that are much lower. The period homes with poor insulation and single glazing lose heat faster which means the radiator will run more frequently, and at higher temperatures in order to compensate for this loss.

The Size Of The Room

Every home is different, and this is also true for rooms in homes. The open-plan areas or the rooms that feature high ceilings use more energy in order to maintain warmth in relation to how the radiator is heating the spaces around them. Hot air will rise and when the radiator starts warming the air that surrounds it, the heat that is created will first travel upwards before it reaches the remaining areas in a room. Spaces that are larger take longer in order to match up to the effects of convected heat that circulates throughout the room. This also means that a radiator with a higher wattage will be required to ensure these spaces are comfortably heated.

Exposure Levels And The Location Of The Property

Terraced homes that attach to other properties on either side benefit from residual heat that comes from the houses that surround it. In addition, these homes also only have 2 exterior-facing sides that are exposed to outdoor elements. On the other hand, a home that is fully detached is exposed on every side and also has a lot more exterior walls which make it harder to maintain warmth.